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Rainy days and Monday's always get me down

In the famous word of Karen Carpenter "Rainy days and monday's always get me down.' I woke up at 6am yesterday morning to pouring rain. It was a monday morning and I was having a shower ready for my shift, I had had a lovely half term holiday, spending time with the family and now it had ended. I could hear Karen Carpenters sweet melodic voice as I washed my hair crooning. Her voice persisted as I put on my uniform, I put on the ID badge and fob watch and slid on my 70 denier tights on my semi wet legs. A little bit of tinted moisturiser and mascara to make me look semi awake.


The cat yowled to be let in, his white fur glistened against the street lights and he strode in like the lord of the manor. Demanded that his loyal subjects fed him, this instant. The dogs hid their faces in the bedding, not worthy to be in the presence of the Lord.


Left over roast dinner and a banana put into my lunch bag, a quick cup of tea to face the pouring rain. So Zoe Ball and I trundled out of town and over the downs towards the stone circle now withstanding the yet another deluge of of rain. I thought of the many years they had been there and how our forefathers had dragged them from Wales. And I was whinging about a drop of rain, in my warm Clio.


I listened to a minister talking about these strange times we were living in and the sense of community, that we as humans are designed to be social creatures.


I certain had missed that sense of community since the pandemic, going out for dinner, meeting with friends to go into Bath, having parties to celebrate achievements and significant events in the lives of friends and family. Life had be striped back, made bare. the enjoyment of holidays, weekend away had been stolen from us all. I reflected upon those soldiers in 1914 in the trenches of France and the despair they must have felt with no end in site. Four years they it took until they came home, and as we know that many never made it home to their families. I look at my two boys who are the age they could have been enlisted at. I cannot image the pain their parents must have felt.


In my 40 minute drive to work, I had put the worlds to the right and put life into perspective, as we were facing a second lockdown. So it was only for 1 month, the boys who went out to France in the first & second world wars went for 4years. This is a temporary situation, the world sort itself out, we would find an equilibrium. We would find an even keel again and in the famous words of another Karen Carpenter


"Tomorrow maybe even brighter than today

Since I threw my sadness away

Only yesterday "










































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